Field Notes from an Unintentional Birder

Field Notes from an Unintentional Birder


  • Release: 2020-09-12
  • Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, page
  • ISBN: 9781771622493
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When Julia Zarankin saw her first red-winged blackbird at the age of thirty-five, she didn’t expect that it would change her life. Recently divorced and auditioning hobbies during a stressful career transition, she stumbled on birdwatching, initially out of curiosity for the strange breed of humans who wear multi-pocketed vests, carry spotting scopes and discuss the finer points of optics with disturbing fervour. What she never could have predicted was that she would become one of them. Not only would she come to identify proudly as a birder, but birding would ultimately lead her to find love, uncover a new language and lay down her roots. Field Notes from an Unintentional Birder tells the story of finding meaning in midlife through birds. The book follows the peregrinations of a narrator who learns more from birds than she ever anticipated, as she begins to realize that she herself is a migratory species: born in the former Soviet Union, growing up in Vancouver and Toronto, studying and working in the United States and living in Paris. Coming from a Russian immigrant family of concert pianists who believed that the outdoors were for “other people,” Julia Zarankin recounts the challenges and joys of unexpectedly discovering one’s wild side and finding one’s tribe in the unlikeliest of places. Zarankin’s thoughtful and witty anecdotes illuminate the joyful experience of a new discovery and the surprising pleasure to be found while standing still on the edge of a lake at six a.m. In addition to confirmed nature enthusiasts, this book will appeal to readers of literary memoir, offering keen insight on what it takes to find one’s place in the world.

Field Notes from an Unintentional Birder

Field Notes from an Unintentional Birder


  • Release: 2020-05-02
  • Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 256 page
  • ISBN: 1771622482
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A writer discovers an unexpected passion for birding, along with a new understanding of the world and her own place in it.

How to be a Bad Birdwatcher

How to be a Bad Birdwatcher


  • Release: 2011-11-03
  • Publisher: Short Books
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 240 page
  • ISBN: 9781780720692
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Look out of the window. See a bird. Enjoy it. Congratulations. You are now a bad birdwatcher. Anyone who has ever gazed up at the sky or stared out of the window knows something about birds. In this funny, inspiring, eye-opening book, Simon Barnes paints a riveting picture of how bird-watching has framed his life and can help us all to a better understanding of our place on this planet. How to be a bad birdwatcher shows why birdwatching is not the preserve of twitchers, but one of the simplest, cheapest and most rewarding pastimes around.

Kingbird Highway

Kingbird Highway


  • Release: 2006-04-11
  • Publisher: HMH
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 336 page
  • ISBN: 0547349440
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An ornithologist’s account of his youthful, year-long, cross-country birdwatching adventure: “A fascinating memoir of an obsession.” —Booklist At sixteen, Kenn Kaufman dropped out of the high school where he was student council president and hit the road, hitching back and forth across America, from Alaska to Florida, Maine to Mexico. Maybe not all that unusual a thing to do in the seventies, but what Kenn was searching for was a little different: not sex, drugs, God, or even self, but birds. A report of a rare bird would send him hitching nonstop from Pacific to Atlantic and back again. When he was broke he would pick fruit or do odd jobs to earn the fifty dollars or so that would last him for weeks. His goal was to set a record—most North American species seen in a year—but along the way he began to realize that at this breakneck pace he was only looking, not seeing. What had been a game became a quest for a deeper understanding of the natural world. Kingbird Highway is a unique coming-of-age story, combining a lyrical celebration of nature with wild, and sometimes dangerous, adventures, starring a colorful cast of characters.

Field Notes from a Pandemic

Field Notes from a Pandemic


  • Release: 2020-09-29
  • Publisher: Signal
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 240 page
  • ISBN: 9780771029974
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Equal parts travelogue and pandemic guide, journalist Ethan Lou examines the societal effects of COVID-19 and takes us on a mesmerizing journey around a world that will never be the same. Visiting Beijing in January to see his dying grandfather, Canadian journalist Ethan Lou unknowingly walks into a state under siege. In his journey out of China and into other hot zones in Asia and Europe, he finds himself witnessing the very earliest stages of a virus that will forever change the world as we know it. Lou argues that Coronavirus will have a far greater impact than SARS, for example, simply because China is now many more times integrated with the increasingly interconnected world. Over decades, globalization has crafted a world painfully sensitive and susceptible to shocks such as this pandemic. A crisis like it has thus been long overdue--and we have yet to see it unfold fully. In our integrated world, events that may previously be isolated now ripple farther and wider and in ways we do not expect and cannot foresee. We have not seen the worst, and if and when we outlast this pandemic, nothing will ever be the same--not just healthcare systems but also economies, politics and culture. Decisions now--or indecisions--will shape and define the world for decades. These ideas are fleshed out through the virus's spawning and how it spread, the unprecedented measures to contain it and an examination of past pandemics and other crises and how they shaped the world--and an argument for why this one's different. Lou shows how drastically the virus has transformed the world and charts the greater and more radical shifts to come. His ideas and arguments are framed around his journey around the world, whose path the virus seemed to follow until he landed safely in quarantine in a small town in Germany where he was able to take stock and start telling his story.

Best Places to Bird in Ontario

Best Places to Bird in Ontario


  • Release: 2019-05-07
  • Publisher: Greystone Books Ltd
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 288 page
  • ISBN: 9781771643658
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An insider’s guide to the best birding in Ontario, featuring thirty highly recommended sites. It’s no secret: Ontario’s rich natural landscape and diverse wildlife provides some of the most exceptional birdwatching Canada has to offer, attracting thousands of bird-lovers each year. In this user-friendly guidebook, local experts Mike and Ken Burrell show us why. Outlining thirty of their personal favorite spots at which to enjoy the province’s birding, they take readers on an avian tour from Point Pelee to Moosonee, Rainy River to Cornwall. Along the way, they draw from their extensive experience as professional birding guides and field biologists to share insider tips for spotting more than three hundred unique species, advice for exactly when and where to go for the best results, and helpful hints for finding rarely seen birds. Finally, they provide detailed instructions for accessing and enjoying each of the highly recommended sites. Ranging from beloved classics to remote hidden gems, many of these locales are within driving distance of Toronto, Hamilton, or Ottawa; some are even accessible on foot; and each is as spectacular as the last. With clear maps, beautiful color photos, and a wealth of useful information, Best Places to Bird in Ontario is an invaluable resource that will delight first-time and experienced birders alike.

The Bird Way

The Bird Way


  • Release: 2020-05-05
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 368 page
  • ISBN: 9780735223028
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From the New York Times bestselling author of The Genius of Birds, a radical investigation into the bird way of being, and the recent scientific research that is dramatically shifting our understanding of birds -- how they live and how they think. “There is the mammal way and there is the bird way.” But the bird way is much more than a unique pattern of brain wiring, and lately, scientists have taken a new look at bird behaviors they have, for years, dismissed as anomalies or mysteries –– What they are finding is upending the traditional view of how birds conduct their lives, how they communicate, forage, court, breed, survive. They are also revealing the remarkable intelligence underlying these activities, abilities we once considered uniquely our own: deception, manipulation, cheating, kidnapping, infanticide, but also ingenious communication between species, cooperation, collaboration, altruism, culture, and play. Some of these extraordinary behaviors are biological conundrums that seem to push the edges of, well, birdness: a mother bird that kills her own infant sons, and another that selflessly tends to the young of other birds as if they were her own; a bird that collaborates in an extraordinary way with one species—ours—but parasitizes another in gruesome fashion; birds that give gifts and birds that steal; birds that dance or drum, that paint their creations or paint themselves; birds that build walls of sound to keep out intruders and birds that summon playmates with a special call—and may hold the secret to our own penchant for playfulness and the evolution of laughter. Drawing on personal observations, the latest science, and her bird-related travel around the world, from the tropical rainforests of eastern Australia and the remote woodlands of northern Japan, to the rolling hills of lower Austria and the islands of Alaska’s Kachemak Bay, Jennifer Ackerman shows there is clearly no single bird way of being. In every respect, in plumage, fo

Nests  Eggs  Birds

Nests Eggs Birds


  • Release: 2020-03-10
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 144 page
  • ISBN: 9780399581861
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Discover the world's birds, their homes, and their eggs in this gorgeously illustrated, entertaining, and educational guide. Did you know that the tailorbird "sews" leaves together to make its nest? Or that hummingbird eggs are the size of jellybeans? Birds are some of the world's most beautiful and interesting creatures, and their nests and eggs are no exception, displaying a stunning diversity of shapes, sizes, functions, and materials. In Nests, Eggs, Birds, celebrated artist and author Kelsey Oseid explores the fascinating ins and outs of where and how dozens of avian species--robins, birds of paradise, crows, owls, penguins, and more--make their homes and lay their eggs. Full of striking naturalistic art and fun scientific facts, Nests, Eggs, Birds will delight bird lovers of all ages.

How to Know the Birds

How to Know the Birds


  • Release: 2019-03-12
  • Publisher: National Geographic Books
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 304 page
  • ISBN: 9781426220043
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Become a better birder with brief portraits of 200 top North American birds. This friendly, relatable book is a celebration of the art, science, and delights of bird-watching. How to Know the Birds introduces a new, holistic approach to bird-watching, by noting how behaviors, settings, and seasonal cycles connect with shape, song, color, gender, age distinctions, and other features traditionally used to identify species. With short essays on 200 observable species, expert author Ted Floyd guides us through a year of becoming a better birder, each species representing another useful lesson: from explaining scientific nomenclature to noting how plumage changes with age, from chronicling migration patterns to noting hatchling habits. Dozens of endearing pencil sketches accompany Floyd's charming prose, making this book a unique blend of narrative and field guide. A pleasure for birders of all ages, this witty book promises solid lessons for the beginner and smiles of recognition for the seasoned nature lover.

That Wasn   t the Plan

That Wasn t the Plan


  • Release: 2020-10-03
  • Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 276 page
  • ISBN: 9781771622554
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Many Canadians will remember Reg Sherren as host of the popular CBC TV program Country Canada, when he criss-crossed the nation sniffing out amazing but little-known stories of life in small towns and rural areas. Others will recall his many years as feature reporter for CBC’s flagship news program, The National, collecting stories like that of Montreal inventor Catalin Alexandru Duru magically soaring above the earth on his home-made hoverboard to set a new Guinness World Record. In the course of his eventful career, Sherren did everything from guest hosting network radio shows like Cross Country Checkup to reporting from war zones, and his experiences make for a book bristling with memorable characters, unbelievable events and provocative reflection. Breaking news, politics, crime, economics—Sherren covered it all, and always with what Peter Mansbridge called “his unique ability to weave fascinating detail into the fabric of the people and places that make our nation so diverse and so interesting.” In this memoir, Sherren shares behind-the-scenes stories of his career in television journalism and the many Canadians he met along the way, from the time he rode on the back of a humpback whale to a journey down the world’s longest ice road in a solar-powered car. Sherren also provides insight into the changing business of broadcasting, having witnessed up-close how the industry has evolved, and why it is more important now than ever. That Wasn’t the Plan will appeal to industry insiders, CBC fans, history buffs and anyone who simply enjoys a good rollicking read.