Framing America

Framing America


  • Release: 2017
  • Publisher:
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 374 page
  • ISBN: 0500292957
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"Framing America takes an inclusive approach to American art. Along with comprehensive coverage of the canon, it expands and integrates treatment of frequently marginalized groups, while also addressing domestic arts and a range of political and social contexts. This fully revised fourth edition, reorganized in response to readers' suggestions, includes thirty-two chapters now arranged into nine parts, and available in two separate volumes; part openers featuring timelines and introductions that highlight how major events and artistic movements relate chronologically; increased coverage of the lives and work of women, African Americans, and Native Americans; new images--from a sixteenth-century print of the Spanish conquest of the Americas and a seventeenth-century embroidered altar frontal from New France, to nineteenth century American Impressionist landscape paintings and photographic portraits of San Francisco's Chinatown and Civil War battlefields; new review questions at the end of each chapter; instructor resources, including a fully revised test bank, the author's notes on using the book, links to further relevant material, and images for instructors"--

Framing American Divorce

Framing American Divorce


  • Release: 1999-02-01
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 258 page
  • ISBN: 0520928008
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Divorce has become one of the most widely discussed issues in America. In this innovative exploration of the phenomenon of divorce in American society, Norma Basch uses a variety of analytic perspectives to enrich our understanding of the meaning of divorce during the formative years of both the nation and its law, roughly 1770 to 1870. She provides a fascinating, thoughtful look at divorce as a legal action, as an individual experience, and as a cultural symbol in its era of institutionalization and traces the powerful legacy of the first American divorce experiences for us today. Using a unique methodology, Basch fragments her story into three discrete but chronologically overlapping perspectives. In Part I, "Rules," she analyzes the changing legal and legislative aspects of divorce and the public response to them. Part II, "Mediations," focuses on individual cases and presents a close-up analysis of the way ordinary women and men tested the law in the courts. And Part III, "Representations," charts the spiraling imagery of divorce through various fiction and non-fiction narratives that made their way into American popular culture during the nineteenth century. The composite picture that emerges in Framing American Divorce is a vividly untidy one that exposes the gulf between legal and moral abstractions and everyday practices. Divorce, Basch argues, was always a focal point of conflict between the autonomy of women and the authority of men. Tracing the legal, social, and cultural experience of divorce allows Basch to provide a searching exploration of the limits of nineteenth-century ideals of domesticity, romantic love, and marriage, and their legacy for us today. She brings her findings up-to-date with a provocative discussion of the current debate over fault or no-fault divorce.

Framing America  Art and architecture in the northern territories of New Spain  c  900 1821

Framing America Art and architecture in the northern territories of New Spain c 900 1821


  • Release: 2017
  • Publisher:
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 600 page
  • ISBN: OCLC:1013934141
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"Framing America takes an inclusive approach to American art. Along with comprehensive coverage of the canon, it expands and integrates treatment of frequently marginalized groups, while also addressing domestic arts and a range of political and social contexts. This fully revised fourth edition, reorganized in response to readers' suggestions, includes thirty-two chapters now arranged into nine parts, and available in two separate volumes; part openers featuring timelines and introductions that highlight how major events and artistic movements relate chronologically; increased coverage of the lives and work of women, African Americans, and Native Americans; new images--from a sixteenth-century print of the Spanish conquest of the Americas and a seventeenth-century embroidered altar frontal from New France, to nineteenth century American Impressionist landscape paintings and photographic portraits of San Francisco's Chinatown and Civil War battlefields; new review questions at the end of each chapter; instructor resources, including a fully revised test bank, the author's notes on using the book, links to further relevant material, and images for instructors"--

Framing American Politics

Framing American Politics


  • Release: 2005
  • Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 264 page
  • ISBN: 9780822972723
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Most issues in American political life are complex and multifaceted, subject to multiple interpretations and points of view. How issues are framed matters enormously for the way they are understood and debated. For example, is affirmative action a just means toward a diverse society, or is it reverse discrimination? Is the war on terror a defense of freedom and liberty, or is it an attack on privacy and other cherished constitutional rights? Bringing together some of the leading researchers in American politics, Framing American Politics explores the roles that interest groups, political elites, and the media play in framing political issues for the mass public. The contributors address some of the most hotly debated foreign and domestic policies in contemporary American life, focusing on both the origins and process of framing and its effects on citizens. In so doing, these scholars clearly demonstrate how frames can both enhance and hinder political participation and understanding.

The Routledge Companion to African American Art History

The Routledge Companion to African American Art History


  • Release: 2019-11-28
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 488 page
  • ISBN: 9781351045179
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This Companion authoritatively points to the main areas of enquiry within the subject of African American art history. The first section examines how African American art has been constructed over the course of a century of published scholarship. The second section studies how African American art is and has been taught and researched in academia. The third part focuses on how African American art has been reflected in art galleries and museums. The final section opens up understandings of what we mean when we speak of African American art. This book will be of interest to graduate students, researchers, and professors and may be used in American art, African American art, visual culture, and culture classes.

Reading American Art

Reading American Art


  • Release: 1998
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 470 page
  • ISBN: 0300069987
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This anthology brings together twenty outstanding works of recent scholarship on the history of the visual arts in the United States from the colonial period to 1945. The selected essays--all written within the past two decades--reflect the interdisciplinary character of current art historiography in America and the variety of approaches that contribute to the dynamism in the field. The authors take up diverse subjects--from colonial portraits to nineteenth-century sculptures of women to photographic images of New York--and invite those with a general knowledge of the history of American art to think more deeply about art and culture. Employing many interpretive methodologies, including iconology, social history, structuralism, psychobiography, and feminist theory, the contributors to this volume combine close analysis of specific art objects or groups of objects with discussion of how these works of art operated within their cultural contexts. The authors consider the works of such artists as John Singleton Copley, Charles Willson Peale, Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Jackson Pollock as they assess how paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, and photographs have carried meaning within American society. And they investigate how the conceptualization, production, and presentation of works of art both inform and are informed by prevailing attitudes toward the role of the arts and the artist in American culture.

Framing First Contact

Framing First Contact


  • Release: 2020-10-29
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 174 page
  • ISBN: 9780806168227
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Representations of first contact—the first meetings of European explorers and Native Americans—have always had a central place in our nation’s historical and visual record. They have also had a key role in shaping and interpreting that record. In Framing First Contact author Kate Elliott looks at paintings by artists from George Catlin to Charles M. Russell and explores what first contact images tell us about the process of constructing national myths—and how those myths acquired different meanings at different points in our nation’s history. First contact images, with their focus on beginnings rather than conclusive action or determined outcomes, might depict historical events in a variety of ways. Elliott argues that nineteenth-century artists, responding to the ambiguity and indeterminacy of the subject, used the visualized space between cultures meeting for the first time to address critical contemporary questions and anxieties. Taking works from the 1840s through the 1910s as case studies—paintings by Robert W. Weir, Thomas Moran, and Albert Bierstadt, along with Catlin and Russell—Elliott shows how many first contact representations, especially those commissioned and conceived as official history, speak blatantly of conquest, racial superiority, and imperialism. Yet others communicate more nuanced messages that might surprise contemporary viewers. Elliott suggests it was the very openness of the subject of first contact that allowed artists, consciously or not, to speak of contemporary issues beyond imperialism and conquest. Uncovering those issues, Framing First Contact forces us to think about why we tell the stories we do, and why those stories matter.

Framing Class

Framing Class


  • Release: 2011-04-16
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 310 page
  • ISBN: 9781442202252
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Framing Class explores how the media, including television, film, and news, depict wealth and poverty in the United States. Fully updated and revised throughout, the second edition of this groundbreaking book now includes discussions of new media, updated media sources, and provocative new examples from movies and television, such as The Real Housewives series and media portrayals of the new poor and corporate executives in the recent recession. The book introduces the concepts of class and media framing to students and analyzes how the media portray various social classes, from the elite to the very poor. Its accessible writing and powerful examples make it an ideal text or supplement for courses in sociology, American studies, and communications.

Making Marriage Work

Making Marriage Work


  • Release: 2009-02-01
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 248 page
  • ISBN: 0807889822
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By the end of World War I, the skyrocketing divorce rate in the United States had generated a deep-seated anxiety about marriage. This fear drove middle-class couples to seek advice, both professional and popular, in order to strengthen their relationships. In Making Marriage Work, historian Kristin Celello offers an insightful and wide-ranging account of marriage and divorce in America in the twentieth century, focusing on the development of the idea of marriage as "work." Throughout, Celello illuminates the interaction of marriage and divorce over the century and reveals how the idea that marriage requires work became part of Americans' collective consciousness.