Human Rights Unbound

Human Rights Unbound


  • Release: 2020-05-03
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 270 page
  • ISBN: 9780192608499
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This book explores to what extent a state owes human rights obligations to individuals outside of its territory, when the conduct of that state impacts upon the lives of those individuals. It draws upon legal and political philosophy to develop a theory of extraterritoriality based on the nature of human rights, merging accounts of economic, social, and cultural rights with those of civil and political rights Lea Raible outlines four main arguments aimed at changing the way we think about the extraterritoriality of human rights. First, she argues that questions regarding extraterritoriality are really about justifying the allocation of human rights obligations to specific states. Second, the book shows that human rights as found in international human rights treaties are underpinned by the values of integrity and equality. Third, she shows that these same values justify the allocation of human rights obligations towards specific individuals to public institutions - including states - that hold political power over those individuals. And finally, the book demonstrates that title to territory is best captured by the value of stability, as opposed to integrity and equality. On this basis, Raible concludes that all standards in international human rights treaties that count as human rights require that a threshold of jurisdiction, understood as political power over individuals, is met. The book applies this theory of extraterritoriality to explain the obligations of states in a wide range of cases.

The Idea of Human Rights

The Idea of Human Rights


  • Release: 2011-07-28
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 256 page
  • ISBN: 9780199604371
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Human rights have become one of the most important moral concepts in global political life over the last 60 years. Charles Beitz, one of the world's leading philosophers, offers a compelling new examination of the idea of a human right.

Mobilizing for Human Rights

Mobilizing for Human Rights


  • Release: 2009-08-31
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 451 page
  • ISBN: 9780521885102
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Beth Simmons demonstrates through a combination of statistical analysis and case studies that the ratification of treaties generally leads to better human rights practices. She argues that international human rights law should get more practical and rhetorical support from the international community as a supplement to broader efforts to address conflict, development, and democratization.

Surrendering to Utopia

Surrendering to Utopia


  • Release: 2009-05-01
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 200 page
  • ISBN: 9780804771214
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Surrendering to Utopia is a critical and wide-ranging study of anthropology's contributions to human rights. Providing a unique window into the underlying political and intellectual currents that have shaped human rights in the postwar period, this ambitious work opens up new opportunities for research, analysis, and political action. At the book's core, the author describes a "well-tempered human rights"—an orientation to human rights in the twenty-first century that is shaped by a sense of humility, an appreciation for the disorienting fact of multiplicity, and a willingness to make the mundaneness of social practice a source of ethical inspiration. In examining the curious history of anthropology's engagement with human rights, this book moves from more traditional anthropological topics within the broader human rights community—for example, relativism and the problem of culture—to consider a wider range of theoretical and empirical topics. Among others, it examines the link between anthropology and the emergence of "neoliberal" human rights, explores the claim that anthropology has played an important role in legitimizing these rights, and gauges whether or not this is evidence of anthropology's potential to transform human rights theory and practice more generally.

Security Unbound

Security Unbound


  • Release: 2014-05-09
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 216 page
  • ISBN: 9781317813071
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Security concerns have mushroomed. Increasingly numerous areas of life are governed by security policies and technologies. Security Unbound argues that when insecurities pervade how we relate to our neighbours, how we perceive international politics, how governments formulate policies, at stake is not our security but our democracy. Security is not in the first instance a right or value but a practice that challenges democratic institutions and actions. We are familiar with emergency policies in the name of national security challenging parliamentary processes, the space for political dissent, and fundamental rights. Yet, security practice and technology pervade society heavily in very mundane ways without raising national security crises, in particular through surveillance technology and the management of risks and uncertainties in many areas of life. These more diffuse security practices create societies in which suspicion becomes a default way of relating and governing relations, ranging from neighbourhood relations over financial transactions to cross border mobility. Security Unbound demonstrates that governing through suspicion poses serious challenges to democratic practice. Some of these challenges are familiar, such as the erosion of the right to privacy; others are less so, such as the post-human challenge to citizenship. Security unbound provokes us to see that the democratic political stake today is not our security but preventing insecurity from becoming the organising principle of political and social life.

Globalizing Human Rights

Globalizing Human Rights


  • Release: 2012-03-12
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 294 page
  • ISBN: 9781136646942
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Globalizing Human Rights explores the complexities of the role human rights played in U.S.-Soviet relations during the 1970s and 1980s. It will show how private citizens exploited the larger effects of contemporary globalization and the language of the Final Act to enlist the U.S. government in a global campaign against Soviet/Eastern European human rights violations. A careful examination of this development shows the limitations of existing literature on the Reagan and Carter administrations’ efforts to promote internal reform in USSR. It also reveals how the Carter administration and private citizens, not Western European governments, played the most important role in making the issue of human rights a fundamental aspect of Cold War competition. Even more important, it illustrates how each administration made the support of non-governmental human rights activities an integral element of its overall approach to weakening the international appeal of the USSR. In addition to looking at the behavior of the U.S. government, this work also highlights the limitations of arguments that focus on the inherent weakness of Soviet dissent during the early to mid 1980s. In the case of the USSR, it devotes considerable attention to why Soviet leaders failed to revive the international reputation of their multinational empire in face of consistent human rights critiques. It also documents the crucial role that private citizens played in shaping Mikhail Gorbachev’s efforts to reform Soviet-style socialism.

The Medical Profession and Human Rights

The Medical Profession and Human Rights


  • Release: 2001
  • Publisher:
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 561 page
  • ISBN: UOM:49015002765254
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The BMA decided to take a thorough new look at the complex interface between medical practitioners and possible abuses of human rights. Its major new report takes its examples from all over the world. It ranges across a great variety of issues, including abuse of institutionalized patients, research involving humans, trade in human organs, doctors and asylum seekers, prison doctors, forensic doctors, the rehabilitation of torture victims, and medical involvement in armed conflicts and weapons research. The BMA decided to take a thorough new look at the complex interface between medical practitioners and possible abuses of human rights. Its major new report takes its examples from all over the world. It ranges across a great variety of issues, including abuse of institutionalized patients, research involving humans, trade in human organs, doctors and asylum seekers, prison doctors, forensic doctors, the rehabilitation of torture victims, and medical involvement in armed conflicts and weapons research.