Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Introduction to American Deaf Culture


  • Release: 2013-01-17
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 370 page
  • ISBN: 9780199777549
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Introduction to American Deaf Culture provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Deaf in contemporary hearing society. The book offers an overview of Deaf art, literature, history, and humor, and touches on political, social and cultural themes.

Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Introduction to American Deaf Culture


  • Release: 2012-12-21
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 386 page
  • ISBN: 9780190240851
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Introduction to American Deaf Culture is the only comprehensive textbook that provides a broad, yet in-depth, exploration of how Deaf people are best understood from a cultural perspective, with coverage of topics such as how culture is defined, how the concept of culture can be applied to the Deaf experience, and how Deaf culture has evolved over the years. Among the issues included are an analysis of various segments of the Deaf community, Deaf cultural norms, the tension between the Deaf and disabled communities, Deaf art and literature (both written English and ASL forms), the solutions being offered by the Deaf community for effective living as Deaf individuals, and an analysis of the universality of the Deaf experience, including the enculturation process that many Deaf people undergo as they develop healthy identities. As a member of a multigenerational Deaf family with a lifetime of experience living bi-culturally among Deaf and hearing people, author Thomas K. Holcomb enhances the text with engaging stories interwoven throughout. In addition to being used in college-level courses, this book can also help parents and educators of Deaf children understand the world of Deaf culture. It offers a beautiful introduction to the ways Deaf people effectively manage their lives in a world full of people who can hear.

Deaf Culture

Deaf Culture


  • Release: 2020-11-12
  • Publisher: Plural Publishing
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 384 page
  • ISBN: 9781635501803
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A contemporary and vibrant Deaf culture is found within Deaf communities, including Deaf Persons of Color and those who are DeafDisabled and DeafBlind. Taking a more people-centered view, the second edition of Deaf Culture: Exploring Deaf Communities in the United States critically examines how Deaf culture fits into education, psychology, cultural studies, technology, and the arts. With the acknowledgment of signed languages all over the world as bona fide languages, the perception of Deaf people has evolved into the recognition and acceptance of a vibrant Deaf culture centered around the use of signed languages and the communities of Deaf peoples. Written by Deaf and hearing authors with extensive teaching experience and immersion in Deaf cultures and signed languages, Deaf Culture fills a niche as an introductory textbook that is more inclusive, accessible, and straightforward for those beginning their studies of the Deaf-World. New to the Second Edition: *A new co-author, Topher González Ávila, MA *Two new chapters! Chapter 7 “Deaf Communities Within the Deaf Community” highlights the complex variations within this community Chapter 10 “Deaf People and the Legal System: Education, Employment, and Criminal Justice” underscores linguistic and access rights *The remaining chapters have been significantly updated to reflect current trends and new information, such as: Advances in technology created by Deaf people that influence and enhance their lives within various national and international societies Greater emphasis on different perspectives within Deaf culture Information about legal issues and recent political action by Deaf people New information on how Deaf people are making breakthroughs in the entertainment industry Addition of new vignettes, examples, pictures, and perspectives to enhance content interest for readers and facilitate instructor teaching Introduction of theories explained in a practical and reader-friendly manner to ensure understan

Understanding Deaf Culture

Understanding Deaf Culture


  • Release: 2003-02-18
  • Publisher: Multilingual Matters
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 526 page
  • ISBN: 9781847696892
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This book presents a ‘Traveller’s Guide’ to Deaf Culture, starting from the premise that Deaf cultures have an important contribution to make to other academic disciplines, and human lives in general. Within and outside Deaf communities, there is a need for an account of the new concept of Deaf culture, which enables readers to assess its place alongside work on other minority cultures and multilingual discourses. The book aims to assess the concepts of culture, on their own terms and in their many guises and to apply these to Deaf communities. The author illustrates the pitfalls which have been created for those communities by the medical concept of ‘deafness’ and contrasts this with his new concept of “Deafhood”, a process by which every Deaf child, family and adult implicitly explains their existence in the world to themselves and each other.

Inside Deaf Culture

Inside Deaf Culture


  • Release: 2009-06-30
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 224 page
  • ISBN: 9780674041752
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"Inside Deaf Culture relates deaf people's search for a voice of their own, and their proud self-discovery and self-description as a flourishing culture. Padden and Humphries show how the nineteenth-century schools for the deaf, with their denigration of sign language and their insistence on oralist teaching, shaped the lives of deaf people for generations to come. They describe how deaf culture and art thrived in mid-twentieth century deaf clubs and deaf theatre, and profile controversial contemporary technologies." Cf. Publisher's description.

Deaf Culture Our Way

Deaf Culture Our Way


  • Release: 1994
  • Publisher: Dawn Sign Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 115 page
  • ISBN: UVA:X004113548
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This assortment of memorable stories enhances an understanding of how loss of hearing affects the individual.

Signs of Resistance

Signs of Resistance


  • Release: 2002-11-01
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 230 page
  • ISBN: 9780814798911
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Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2003 During the nineteenth century, American schools for deaf education regarded sign language as the "natural language" of Deaf people, using it as the principal mode of instruction and communication. These schools inadvertently became the seedbeds of an emerging Deaf community and culture. But beginning in the 1880s, an oralist movement developed that sought to suppress sign language, removing Deaf teachers and requiring deaf people to learn speech and lip reading. Historians have all assumed that in the early decades of the twentieth century oralism triumphed overwhelmingly. Susan Burch shows us that everyone has it wrong; not only did Deaf students continue to use sign language in schools, hearing teachers relied on it as well. In Signs of Resistance, Susan Burch persuasively reinterprets early twentieth century Deaf history: using community sources such as Deaf newspapers, memoirs, films, and oral (sign language) interviews, Burch shows how the Deaf community mobilized to defend sign language and Deaf teachers, in the process facilitating the formation of collective Deaf consciousness, identity and political organization.