Jesus   Religion

Jesus Religion


  • Release: 2013-10-14
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 240 page
  • ISBN: 9781400205400
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A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Abandon dead, dry, rule-keeping and embrace the promise of being truly known and deeply loved. Jefferson Bethke burst into the cultural conversation in 2012 with a passionate, provocative poem titled “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus.” The 4-minute video literally became an overnight sensation, with 7 million YouTube views in its first 48 hours (and 23+ million in a year). The message blew up on social-media, triggering an avalanche of responses running the gamut from encouraged to enraged. In Jesus > Religion, Bethke unpacks similar contrasts that he drew in the poem—highlighting the difference between teeth gritting and grace, law and love, performance and peace, despair and hope. With refreshing candor he delves into the motivation behind his message, beginning with the unvarnished tale of his own plunge from the pinnacle of a works-based, fake-smile existence that sapped his strength and led him down a path of destructive behavior. Bethke is quick to acknowledge that he’s not a pastor or theologian, but simply a regular, twenty-something who cried out for a life greater than the one for which he had settled. Along his journey, Bethke discovered the real Jesus, who beckoned him beyond the props of false religion.

Jesus   Religion

Jesus Religion


  • Release: 2013
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson Publishers
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 240 page
  • ISBN: 1400205395
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The author of a popular YouTube poem looks at the motivation behind his message, beginning with the tale of his own plunge from the works-based existence that led him down a path of destructive behavior to his discovery of the true Jesus.

Jesus Hates Religion

Jesus Hates Religion


  • Release: 2014-05
  • Publisher: B&H Publishing Group
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 233 page
  • ISBN: 9781433682797
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Alex Himaya writes for those who have been hurt by religious people– who have been betrayed by religion– because he too has been wounded. No longer content with pretending those things don't happen, pastor Himaya retreats with readers back to the Scriptures to see what Jesus thinks about man-made religion. Himaya points readers away from himself, and towards Jesus saying, "Don't trust me. Trust God, and let Him speak for Himself."

War Inconsistent with the Religion of Jesus Christ

War Inconsistent with the Religion of Jesus Christ


  • Release: 2019-12-17
  • Publisher: Good Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 200 page
  • ISBN: EAN:4064066172886
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"War Inconsistent with the Religion of Jesus Christ" by David Low Dodge. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

The Lost Religion of Jesus

The Lost Religion of Jesus


  • Release: 2000
  • Publisher: Lantern Books
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 260 page
  • ISBN: 1930051263
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Jesus' preaching was first and foremost about simple living, pacifism, and vegetarianism; he never intended to create a new religion separate from Judaism. Moreover, Jesus' radical Jewish ethics, rather than a new theology, distinguished him and his followers from other Jews. It was the earliest followers of Jesus, the Jewish Christians, who understood Jesus better than any of the gentile Christian groups, which are the spiritual ancestors of modern Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox churches. In this detailed and accessible study, Keith Akers uncovers the history of Jewish Christianity from its origins in the Essenes and John the Baptist, through Jesus, until its disappearance into Islamic mysticism sometime in the seventh or eighth century. Akers argues that only by really understanding this mysterious and much misunderstood strand of early Christianity can we get to the heart of the radical message of Jesus of Nazareth.

Jesus Without Religion

Jesus Without Religion


  • Release: 2009-09-20
  • Publisher: InterVarsity Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, page
  • ISBN: 0830875875
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Great. Another book about Jesus. Whose agenda will the author be lugging along this time? Author Rick James begins by clearing his throat. Free of creeds, quarrels and specialized theologies, he speaks of Jesus. No dogma, no politics, no moral at the end. Jesus. What he said. What he did. And what, exactly, was the point. The answers about Jesus, according to Rick James, are in the context. In his own unconventional way, James recalls the specific contexts that color Jesus' story, bringing forward this man you've heard so much—and so little—about.

Heaven and Hell

Heaven and Hell


  • Release: 2020-03-31
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 352 page
  • ISBN: 9781501136757
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A New York Times bestselling historian of early Christianity takes on two of the most gripping questions of human existence: where did the ideas of heaven and hell come from, and why do they endure? What happens when we die? A recent Pew Research poll showed that 72% of Americans believe in a literal heaven, 58% in a literal hell. Most people who hold these beliefs are Christian and assume they are the age-old teachings of the Bible. But eternal rewards and punishments are found nowhere in the Old Testament and are not what Jesus or his disciples taught. So where did the ideas come from? In clear and compelling terms, Bart Ehrman recounts the long history of the afterlife, ranging from The Epic of Gilgamesh up to the writings of Augustine, focusing especially on the teachings of Jesus and his early followers. He discusses ancient guided tours of heaven and hell, in which a living person observes the sublime blessings of heaven for those who are saved and the horrifying torments of hell for the damned. Some of these accounts take the form of near death experiences, the oldest on record, with intriguing similarities to those reported today. One of Ehrman’s startling conclusions is that there never was a single Greek, Jewish, or Christian understanding of the afterlife, but numerous competing views. Moreover, these views did not come from nowhere; they were intimately connected with the social, cultural, and historical worlds out of which they emerged. Only later, in the early Christian centuries, did they develop into the notions of eternal bliss or damnation widely accepted today. As a historian, Ehrman obviously cannot provide a definitive answer to the question of what happens after death. In Heaven and Hell, he does the next best thing: by helping us reflect on where our ideas of the afterlife come from, he assures us that even if there may be something to hope for when we die, there is certainly nothing to fear.