Levelling the Lake

Levelling the Lake


  • Release: 2019-02-15
  • Publisher: UBC Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 404 page
  • ISBN: 9780774835510
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Levelling the Lake explores a century and a half of social, economic, and legal arrangements through which the resources and environment of the Lake of the Woods and Rainy Lake watershed have been both harnessed and harmed. Jamie Benidickson traces the environmental consequences of resource extraction and recreation as well as their impacts on local residents, including Indigenous communities, which encouraged new legal and institutional responses. Assessing the transition from primary resource extraction toward sustainable development, Levelling the Lake also shows how interjurisdictional and transboundary issues continue to play a significant role throughout the region.

Wet Prairie

Wet Prairie


  • Release: 2011-06-29
  • Publisher: UBC Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 264 page
  • ISBN: 9780774859929
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The Canadian prairies are often envisioned as dry, windswept fields; however, much of southern Manitoba is not arid plain but wet prairie, poorly drained land subject to frequent flooding. Shannon Stunden Bower brings to light the complexities of surface-water management in Manitoba, from early artificial drainage efforts to late-twentieth-century attempts at watershed management. She engages scholarship on the state, liberalism, and bioregionalism in order to probe the connections between human and environmental change in the wet prairie. This account of an overlooked aspect of the region's environmental history reveals how the biophysical nature of southern Manitoba has been an important factor in the formation of Manitoba society and the provincial state.

Debates

Debates


  • Release: 1883
  • Publisher:
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, page
  • ISBN: STANFORD:36105028015761
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What is Water

What is Water


  • Release: 2010
  • Publisher: UBC Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 333 page
  • ISBN: 9780774817011
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We all know what water is, and we often take it for granted. But the spectre of a worldwide water crisis suggests that there might be something fundamentally wrong with the way we think about water. Jamie Linton dives into the history of water as an abstract concept, stripped of its environmental, social, and cultural contexts. Reduced to a scientific abstraction - to mere H20 - this concept has given modern society licence to dam, divert, and manipulate water with apparent impunity. Part of the solution to the water crisis involves reinvesting water with social content, thus altering the way we see water. An original take on a deceptively complex issue, What Is Water? offers a fresh approach to a fundamental problem.