Sand Against the Wind

Sand Against the Wind


  • Release: 2007-10-23
  • Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 652 page
  • ISBN: 9781462817481
GET EBOOK

Nettie meets an irresistible rogue, and after a whirlwind wooing in the 1929 Appalachian summer, finds herself living at Millview, a farm located miles from everything she loves. She struggles to make her marriage work despite the ever-present shadow of Lurania, Millard's mother, and Herbert, his first cousin. Nettie resolves to be a good wife, but plans to leave as soon as she has the money. Faced with an insolent Depression and Millard's intermittent rages, Nettie plans a new life for her children as she conceals her own. "It's one of the best historical novel manuscripts I've received in a long time." Wm. Greenleaf, Editor, Writer's Digest.

Sand Against the Wind

Sand Against the Wind


  • Release: 2008
  • Publisher: Gale Cengage
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 389 page
  • ISBN: 1410408507
GET EBOOK

Sweeping saga set in Carmarthenshire, Wales, between 1917 and 1946 ; part of the Cwmbran Trilogy.

Reinforcement of Sand Against Wind Erosion by Sporosarcina Pasteurii induced Calcite Precipitation and Fibers

Reinforcement of Sand Against Wind Erosion by Sporosarcina Pasteurii induced Calcite Precipitation and Fibers


  • Release: 2013
  • Publisher:
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 186 page
  • ISBN: OCLC:890717698
GET EBOOK

The main objective of this study is to examine the application of microbial calcite with soil fibers to reduce the wind erosion potential, using a common soil bacterium, Sporosarcina pasteurii, mixed with medium containing urea and calcium chloride. After incubation, treated soil samples were weighed before and after wind erosion tests at different wind speeds to determine the percent mass losses. To optimize the wind erosion resistance, volume variations of the medium applied and soil preparation methods (either biologically treated only or biologically treated with fibers) were examined. Significant reduction in mass loss as compared to that of the untreated sand was observed, indicating that this procedure be used as a means of reducing the wind erosion potential. At wind speeds of 32 and 48 km/hr, virtually no mass loss was observed from the samples treated with 2 ml or more of medium containing bacteria per 100 grams of sand. Results also indicated that different types of fibers yielded varying degrees of wind erosion resistance. The amount of mass loss in descending order was, in general, shredded corn husks, cotton fibers, sand treated with medium containing bacteria with no fibers, hemp fibers, and synthetic fibers.