The Politics of Story in Victorian Social Fiction

The Politics of Story in Victorian Social Fiction


  • Release: 2019-01-24
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 264 page
  • ISBN: 9781501733444
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The most telling expression of the politics of a novel, Rosemarie Bodenheimer asserts, lies not in its proclaimed social intent, its continuity with nonfictional discourse, or its truth to class experience, but in the models of social movement and transformation traced out in the thread of its narrative. The Politics of Story in Victorian Social Fiction explores the story patterns and other narrative conventions through which the industrial or social-problem novel gives fictional shape to questions that were experienced as new, unpredictable, and troubling in the Victorian age. Bodenheimer considers novels explicitly linked with the condition of England debates that preoccupied public-minded Victorians, narratives that confront such topics as the factory system, industrial and rural poverty, working-class politics, and the plight of women. Grouping well-known novels with less frequently read works according to shared narrative patterns, Bodenheimer delineates lines of influence, argument, and development within the subgenre of social fiction. Among the works she discusses are Charlotte Bronte's Shirley, Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South, two novels by Frances Trollope, Geraldine Jewsbury's Marian Withers, George Eliot's Felix Holt the Radical, Charles Dickens's Oliver Twist, and Benjamin Disraeli's Sybil.

Routledge Revivals  Barnaby Rudge  1987

Routledge Revivals Barnaby Rudge 1987


  • Release: 2018-02-01
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 394 page
  • ISBN: 9781351047425
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Originally published in 1987 Barnaby Rudge is a comprehensive collection of bibliographical resources surrounding Dickens fifth novel Barnaby Rudge. The book addresses what the author terms, a ‘prevalent lack of research’ surrounding the novel. The collection lists bibliographic references which not only looks at the novel itself, but also covers older resources that interested Dicken’s first critics, such as the originality of the settings and characters. The book’s core focus is examining the novel’s historical subject matter in the context of the social and political context in which it was written. The book acts as a core resource for research on Barnaby Rudge.

British Imperialism

British Imperialism


  • Release: 2016-03-02
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 794 page
  • ISBN: 9781317389255
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A milestone in the understanding of British history and imperialism, this ground-breaking book radically reinterprets the course of modern economic development and the causes of overseas expansion during the past three centuries. Employing their concept of 'gentlemanly capitalism', the authors draw imperial and domestic British history together to show how the shape of the nation and its economy depended on international and imperial ties, and how these ties were undone to produce the post-colonial world of today. Containing a significantly expanded and updated Foreword and Afterword, this third edition assesses the development of the debate since the book’s original publication, discusses the imperial era in the context of the controversy over globalization, and shows how the study of the age of empires remains relevant to understanding the post-colonial world. Covering the full extent of the British empire from China to South America and taking a broad chronological view from the seventeenth century to post-imperial Britain today, British Imperialism: 1688–2015 is the perfect read for all students of imperial and global history.

The Hell of the English

The Hell of the English


  • Release: 1986
  • Publisher: Bucknell University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 208 page
  • ISBN: 0838750990
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This book identifies and traces bankruptcy as an archetypal experience of the Victorian age and as a major metaphor in the language, imagery, and structure of the Victorian novel. With reference to selected works by Eliot, Bronte, Gaskell, Dickens, and Thackeray, it presents the range of symbolic meanings of the bankruptcy metaphor.