The Crucifixion in American Art

The Crucifixion in American Art


  • Release: 2003-01-01
  • Publisher: McFarland
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 166 page
  • ISBN: 0786414995
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The crucifixion of Christ has been richly portrayed by countless artists for hundreds of years, but it was European Renaissance styles and painters such as Kurz, Benjamin West and John Valentine Haidt that first informed American artists of the possibilities for depicting the crucifixion. This work features artists living and working in America from the mid-18th to the 21st century who depicted the crucifixion of Christ in their artwork. The 19th century saw painters like Julian Russell Story, John Singer Sargent, Vassili Verestchagin and Fred Holland break from the Renaissance tradition of the 18th century to begin a religious art revolution. The 20th century saw painters like Thomas Eakins and George Bellows continuing the traditions of the 19th until the Realist style became dominant, which lasted until the latter part of the century and the rise of Abstract Expressionism and a number of experimental styles such as Op, Pop, and Super-realism.

World War II in American Art

World War II in American Art


  • Release: 2001-01-01
  • Publisher: McFarland
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 157 page
  • ISBN: 0786409851
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Analyzes American painting depicting various aspects of World War II, including battle, prisoners, the homefront, recreation, and victory.

Critical Issues In American Art

Critical Issues In American Art


  • Release: 2018-02-12
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 340 page
  • ISBN: 9780429980831
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This anthology of essays on different critical approaches and methodologies for the analysis and interpretation of American art and artists is designed for students and teachers in American art history and American studies programs. It contains twenty selections from academic journals on American art from colonial times to 1940. Mary Ann Calo provides an introduction to the anthology, explaining its purpose and organization, and each selection has a brief introduction about its main focus and scholarly approach. These case studies show the diversity of scholarly thinking about interpreting American works of art, which should be useful for teachers and comprehensible and interesting for students.This anthology contains twenty articles on American art from colonial times to 1940. The selections are mainly from academic journals and aim to provide the student and teacher with different critical approaches and methodologies for the analysis and interpretation of American art and artists. Mary Ann Calo's preface to the anthology explains its purpose and organization, and each article will have a brief introduction about its main focus and scholarly approach.This text meets the need in American art history studies for an anthology of essays on critical approaches and methodologies.

Themes in American Painting

Themes in American Painting


  • Release: 1992
  • Publisher: McFarland Publishing
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 260 page
  • ISBN: UOM:39015026937816
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Examined are 13 common themes in American painting: mother and child; modes of transportation; the clown; the city; sports; the crucifixion; interiors; natural disasters; wars and aftermath; social protest and injustice; still life; self-portraits; and music. The work of many artists (Ben Shahn, Frederick Remington, Arthur G. Dove, Jacob Lawrence and many others) are used to illustrate common styles. The themes and artists were chosen to represent varying emotional moods and approaches to composition; naturalism, realism, cubism, abstract, abstract expressionism, photorealism and pop schools of art are represented. Heavily illustrated.

The Revival of Pragmatism

The Revival of Pragmatism


  • Release: 1998-11-02
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 464 page
  • ISBN: 9780822382522
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Although long considered the most distinctive American contribution to philosophy, pragmatism—with its problem-solving emphasis and its contingent view of truth—lost popularity in mid-century after the advent of World War II, the horror of the Holocaust, and the dawning of the Cold War. Since the 1960s, however, pragmatism in many guises has again gained prominence, finding congenial places to flourish within growing intellectual movements. This volume of new essays brings together leading philosophers, historians, legal scholars, social thinkers, and literary critics to examine the far-reaching effects of this revival. As the twenty-five intellectuals who take part in this discussion show, pragmatism has become a complex terrain on which a rich variety of contemporary debates have been played out. Contributors such as Richard Rorty, Stanley Cavell, Nancy Fraser, Robert Westbrook, Hilary Putnam, and Morris Dickstein trace pragmatism’s cultural and intellectual evolution, consider its connection to democracy, and discuss its complex relationship to the work of Emerson, Nietzsche, and Wittgenstein. They show the influence of pragmatism on black intellectuals such as W. E. B. Du Bois, explore its view of poetic language, and debate its effects on social science, history, and jurisprudence. Also including essays by critics of the revival such as Alan Wolfe and John Patrick Diggins, the volume concludes with a response to the whole collection from Stanley Fish. Including an extensive bibliography, this interdisciplinary work provides an in-depth and broadly gauged introduction to pragmatism, one that will be crucial for understanding the shape of the transformations taking place in the American social and philosophical scene at the end of the twentieth century. Contributors. Richard Bernstein, David Bromwich, Ray Carney, Stanley Cavell, Morris Dickstein, John Patrick Diggins, Stanley Fish, Nancy Fraser, Thomas C. Grey, Giles Gunn, Hans Joas, James T. Kloppenberg, D

American Crucifixion

American Crucifixion


  • Release: 2014-04-22
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 352 page
  • ISBN: 9781610393140
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On June 27, 1844, a mob stormed the jail in the dusty frontier town of Carthage, Illinois. Clamorous and angry, they were hunting down a man they saw as a grave threat to their otherwise quiet lives: the founding prophet of Mormonism, Joseph Smith. They wanted blood. At thirty-nine years old, Smith had already lived an outsized life. In addition to starting his own religion and creating his own "Golden Bible”--the Book of Mormon--he had worked as a water-dowser and treasure hunter. He’d led his people to Ohio, then Missouri, then Illinois, where he founded a city larger than fledgling Chicago. He was running for president. And, secretly, he had married more than thirty women. In American Crucifixion, Alex Beam tells how Smith went from charismatic leader to public enemy: How his most seismic revelation--the doctrine of polygamy--created a rift among his people; how that schism turned to violence; and how, ultimately, Smith could not escape the consequences of his ambition and pride. Mormonism is America’s largest and most enduring native religion, and the "martyrdom” of Joseph Smith is one of its transformational events. Smith’s brutal assassination propelled the Mormons to colonize the American West and claim their place in the mainstream of American history. American Crucifixion is a gripping story of scandal and violence, with deep roots in our national identity.