The New Humanities Reader

The New Humanities Reader


  • Release: 2003
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin College Division
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 721 page
  • ISBN: 0618216057
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The New Humanities Reader is a cross-disciplinary anthology. The collection contains challenging and important readings from diverse fields that address critical issues in contemporary society. The authors contend that there is a crisis within the humanities field today due to specialisation within narrow fields of knowledge, resulting in a higher education system that produces students who lack the general cross-disciplinary knowledge necessary to become engaged students and informed citizens. This reader exposes students to ideas and research from wide-ranging sources providing opportunities for them to synthesise materials and come up with their own ideas and solutions. Features of this brand new text include: - Articles and essays are alphabetically organised by last name of writer to allow instructors maximum flexibility in organisation - Selections address significant, global issues like the population explosion, our diminishing water supply, and racial inequities

The New Humanities Reader

The New Humanities Reader


  • Release: 2013-12-29
  • Publisher: Wadsworth
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 570 page
  • ISBN: 1285428994
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THE NEW HUMANITIES READER presents 25 challenging and important essays from diverse fields that address current global issues. This cross-disciplinary anthology helps readers attain the analytical skills necessary to become informed citizens. Ideas and research from wide-ranging sources provide opportunities for readers to synthesize materials and formulate their own ideas and solutions. The thought-provoking selections engage and encourage readers to make connections for themselves as they think, read, and write about the events that are likely to shape their lives. The fifth edition includes nearly 50 percent new reading selections, which continue to make this text current, globally oriented, interdisciplinary, and probing.

The New Humanities Reader

The New Humanities Reader


  • Release: 2005
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin College Division
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 712 page
  • ISBN: 0618568220
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The New Humanities Reader presents 32 challenging and important essays from diverse fields that address current global issues. The authors contend that there is a crisis within the humanities today due to specialization within narrow fields of scholarship, resulting in a higher education system that produces students who lack the general cross-disciplinary knowledge needed to better understand today's complex world. The selections encourage students to synthesize and think critically about ideas and research formerly kept apart. This approach challenges readers to resist mimetic thinking and instead creatively connect ideas to help them understand and retain what they read. Through this process of reading, discussing, and writing, students develop the analytical skills necessary to become informed citizens. Focused on today's issues, the selections represent both well-known nonfiction authors and newly published writers and are drawn from such periodicals as The New Yorker and Natural History and from best-selling books including Reading Lolita in Tehran, Fast Food Nation, and Into the Wild. Students will be engaged by reading and rereading, analyzing and working with these selections not simply because they are models of good writing, but because they are also deeply thought-provoking pieces that invite readers to respond.

Health Humanities Reader

Health Humanities Reader


  • Release: 2014-08-28
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 448 page
  • ISBN: 9780813573670
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Over the past forty years, the health humanities, previously called the medical humanities, has emerged as one of the most exciting fields for interdisciplinary scholarship, advancing humanistic inquiry into bioethics, human rights, health care, and the uses of technology. It has also helped inspire medical practitioners to engage in deeper reflection about the human elements of their practice. In Health Humanities Reader, editors Therese Jones, Delese Wear, and Lester D. Friedman have assembled fifty-four leading scholars, educators, artists, and clinicians to survey the rich body of work that has already emerged from the field—and to imagine fresh approaches to the health humanities in these original essays. The collection’s contributors reflect the extraordinary diversity of the field, including scholars from the disciplines of disability studies, history, literature, nursing, religion, narrative medicine, philosophy, bioethics, medicine, and the social sciences. With warmth and humor, critical acumen and ethical insight, Health Humanities Reader truly humanizes the field of medicine. Its accessible language and broad scope offers something for everyone from the experienced medical professional to a reader interested in health and illness.

Creative Writing and the New Humanities

Creative Writing and the New Humanities


  • Release: 2005
  • Publisher: Psychology Press
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 254 page
  • ISBN: 0415332214
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This book examines the institutional history and disciplinary future of creative writing in the contemporary academy, looking well beyond the perennial questions 'can writing be taught?' and 'should writing be taught?'. Paul Dawson traces the emergence of creative writing alongside the new criticism in American universities; examines the writing workshop in relation to theories of creativity and literary criticism; and analyzes the evolution of creative writing pedagogy alongside and in response to the rise of 'theory' in America, England and Australia. Dawson argues that the discipline of creative writing developed as a series of pedagogic responses to the long-standing 'crisis' in literary studies. His polemical account provides a fresh perspective on the importance of creative writing to the emergence of the 'new humanities' and makes a major contribution to current debates about the role of the writer as public intellectual.

Writing at the End of the World

Writing at the End of the World


  • Release: 2005-10-23
  • Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 248 page
  • ISBN: 9780822972846
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What do the humanities have to offer in the twenty-first century? Are there compelling reasons to go on teaching the literate arts when the schools themselves have become battlefields? Does it make sense to go on writing when the world itself is overrun with books that no one reads? In these simultaneously personal and erudite reflections on the future of higher education, Richard E. Miller moves from the headlines to the classroom, focusing in on how teachers and students alike confront the existential challenge of making life meaningful. In meditating on the violent events that now dominate our daily lives—school shootings, suicide bombings, terrorist attacks, contemporary warfare—Miller prompts a reconsideration of the role that institutions of higher education play in shaping our daily experiences, and asks us to reimagine the humanities as centrally important to the maintenance of a compassionate, secular society. By concentrating on those moments when individuals and institutions meet and violence results, Writing at the End of the World provides the framework that students and teachers require to engage in the work of building a better future.

Zoo Studies

Zoo Studies


  • Release: 2019-06-19
  • Publisher: MQUP
  • Price: FREE
  • File: PDF, 345 page
  • ISBN: 9780773558151
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Do both the zoo and the mental hospital induce psychosis, as humans are treated as animals and animals are treated as humans? How have we looked at animals in the past, and how do we look at them today? How have zoos presented themselves, and their purpose, over time? In response to the emergence of environmental and animal studies, anthropologists, sociologists, philosophers, theorists, literature scholars, and historians around the world have begun to explore the significance of zoological parks, past and present. Zoo Studies considers the modern zoo from a range of approaches and disciplines, united in a desire to blur the boundaries between human and nonhuman animals. The volume begins with an account of the first modern mental hospital, La Salpêtrière, established in 1656, and the first panoptical zoo, the menagerie at Versailles, created in 1662 by the same royal architect; the final chapter presents a choreographic performance that imagines the Toronto Zoo as a place where the human body can be inspired by animal bodies. From beginning to end, through interdisciplinary collaboration, this volume decentres the human subject and offers alternative ways of thinking about zoos and their inhabitants. This collection immerses readers in the lives of animals and their experiences of captivity and asks us to reflect on our own assumptions about both humans and animals. An original and groundbreaking work, Zoo Studies will change the way readers see nonhuman animals and themselves.